anthropology

Making the City in Latin America

10:30: Keynote Speaker: Linda Manzanilla (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico)

                  "Teotihuacan, An Exceptional Metropolis in Mesoamerica"

1:15-3:15: Panelists:

        Paul Niell (Art History, Florida State University)

        Eleonora Pasotti (Political Science, UC Santa Cruz)

        Sharon Bailey Glasco (History, Linfield College)

3:30-5:00: UK presenters:

        Gavin Davies (Anthropology)

        Araby Smyth (Geography)

        Barry Kidder (Anthropology

        Francesco Masala (Hispanic Studies)

        Scott Hutson (Anthropology)

        

 

Date: 
Friday, September 30, 2016 - 10:30am to 5:00pm
Location: 
POT 18th floor

Meinarti: the 1500 year history of a Nubian village told by stratigraphy

Meinarti wine press

Date: 
Friday, September 23, 2016 - 4:30pm to 5:45pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Room 108
Type of Event (for grouping events):

UK Archaeologists Protect and Restore Precious Artifacts Found in Mammoth Cave During Extensive Underground Renovations

Peachy-Keen: Tracing the Introduction of Peaches (Prunus persica) into the Americas

This talk demonstrates how plant remains can be used to trace food pathways in the modern day. The plant is peaches and the talk will examine pits recovered from a Mission period archaeological site located on Sapelo Island, one of the Georgia Sea Islands, where UK Dept of Anthropology archaeologist Dr. R. Jefferies is conducting excavations and research.

Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Location: 
Whitehall Classroom Building Rm. 102
Tags/Keywords:

Year of Europe: Intersections of Violence in Latin America, Panel Discussion

As the third session in The Intersections of Violence in Latin America, three distinguished scholars speak about their work on violence:

Rosa Linda Fregoso is a professor of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz. Her areas of specialization are femenicide, gender and racial violence, media and visual arts, and cultural politics in the Americas. Her publications include many single authored and co-edited volumes such as Terrorizing Women: Femenicide in the Americas, MeXicana Encounters: The Making of Social Identities on the Borderlands, and The Bronze Screen: Chicana and Chicano Film Culture. Cecilia Menjivar is currently a foundation distinguished professor in the department of sociology at the University of Kansas. She specializes in immigration, gender, violence, social networks, and religious institutions in the US and Latin America (particularly Central America). She has written over 90 articles and book chapters as well as six books, including Enduring Violence: Ladina Women’s Lives in Guatemala and Fragmented Ties: Salvadoran Immigrant Networks in America, both of which have received numerous awards. She is also currently the Vice President of the American Sociological Association.

Tiffiny Tung is the Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate Studies in Anthropology at Vanderbilt University. She is the director of the Beringa Bioarchaeology and Archaeology Project in the Majes Valley in Arequipa, Peru. Her areas of specialization include paleopathology, violence related trauma, the use of body and body parts in rituals, bioarchaeology of imperialism, and bioarchaeological perspectives on embodiment. Her book is called Violence, Ritual, and the Wari Empire: A Social Bioarchaeology of Imperialism in the Ancient Andes.

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Dr. Mahmood Mamdani

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory at The University of Kentucky is hosting Professor Mahmood Mamdani as its Fall Distinguished Speaker. On October 2, Dr. Mamdani will give a talk entitled “Political Violence and Political Justice: A Critique of Criminal Justice as Accountability.” The talk will take place at 3:30 pm in the W.T. Young Library Auditorium.

Dr. Mamdani is a Professor of Anthropology, Political Science and African Studies at Columbia University. He is also the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government at Columbia University’s School of Internal Affairs. Additionally, he is the Director of the Makerere Institute of Social Research in Kampala, Uganda.

A native of Uganda, Dr. Mamdani was awarded one of 26 scholarships to study in the United States when Uganda won its independence. After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh, Mamdani joined the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He earned a Ph.D. from Harvard in 1972. While conducting dissertation research in Uganda he was expelled by Idi Amin. After the overthrow of Amin, Mamdani returned to Uganda, but his citizenship was eventually revoked as a result of his scholarship’s criticism of the government. During his career Mamdani has been visiting professor at the University of Michigan, University of Durban-Westville, the Nuhru Memorial Museum and Library, and Princeton University. He was also the inaugural chair of African studies at the University of Cape Town.

Professor Mamdani’s current work explores the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, and the history and theory of human rights. His most recent book, Saviors and Survivors: Darfur, Politics, and the War on Terror (2009), investigates how conflict in Darfur began as a civil war and transformed into a War on Terror.

 

 

UK's Phi Kappa Phi Chapter Gains Momentum

"For a chapter which did not even exist six-and-a-half years ago, we're doing pretty well."

May Day Reflections on Aluminum Workers in Indiana

 

Drawing on fieldwork that begun in the US heartland in the world-changing year of 1989, when the fall of the Berlin Wall dramatically ended the long epoch of the Cold War, this paper attempts to demonstrate a long historical view of labor struggles within this ethnographic context.

Sponsored by the Department of Anthropology, University of Kentucky

 

Date: 
Friday, May 1, 2015 - 2:00pm
Location: 
Lafferty Hall Rm. 213

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