anthropology

Anthro Colloquium: Dr. William Y. Adams, "The Boasians"

Professor Emeritus, U Kentucky. He is the winner of the 1978 Herskovits Prize for his history of Nubia, Nubia: Corridor to Africa. In 2005 Adams was awarded the Order of the Two Niles, Sudan's highest civilian honor, for his contributions to Nubian history. Adams's work in Nubia began in 1959 as part of the UNESCO archaeological salvage campaign to excavate sites threatened by the rising flood waters of Lake Nasser following the construction of the Aswan Dam.

"Reflections on March 11, 2011: Japan's Disasters and their Aftermath" - AGSA Distinguished Lecture Series

In the wake of the triple disasters of March 11, 2011 which devastated the Tohoku region of Japan with a massive earthquake, an enormous set of tsunami, and the catastrophic failure of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor, both Japanese and foreign observers struggled to make sense of these events.  Bestor examines some ways in which Japanese culture frames disasters, and based on fieldwork in Tohoku in 2011 and 2012, how local meaning-making unfolds.

Dr. Bestor earned his Ph.D. from Stanford University and is Professor of Social Anthropology and Director of the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies  at Harvard University. His books include: Routledge Handbook of Japanese Culture and Society (edited with Victoria Bestor and Akiko Yamagata, 2011), Doing Fieldwork in Japan (2003), and Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (2004).

The Anthropology Graduate Student Association (AGSA) invites you to join the Department of Anthropology for our 13th annual Distinguished Lecture Series featuring cultrual anthropologist Dr. Thedodore Bestor. This event is free, and open to all. 

Date: 
Thursday, March 13, 2014 - 5:00pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
President's Room Singletary Center

AGSA DISTINGUISHED LECTURE

Sponsor: Anthro Graduate Student Association

Dr. Theodore Bestor, Professor of Social Anthropology, Harvard U.  Director, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies.  

Research Interests: Food systems and culture; the global fishing industry; the impact of the March 11 earthquake, tsunami, and radiation disasters on Japanese society as a whole; urban environments and infrastructures; Japan, East Asia, North Atlantic.  Book:  Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World (University of California, 2004).

Date: 
Friday, March 28, 2014 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 1

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 3

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Isaac Hathaway Family and Education – Clip 2

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.” The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Maranna Lynn Roe Perkins

Excerpt, "Parents"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Betty Knott

Excerpt, "Childhood"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

For more information visit: anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

Davis Bottom: Living Memories // Dorothy Coleman

Excerpt, "Generations"

Much of the contemporary history of Davis Bottom is found in the “living memories of residents. From August 2011 to February 2012, the production team conducted 14 oral history interviews with residents, former residents and community leaders as part of the Davis Bottom History Preservation Project. “I think oral history has a huge role in our consideration of the past,” says Dr. Kim McBride, Co-Director, Kentucky Archaeological Survey. “At a very general level, it provides a different source of data; often filling in gaps that we cannot reach using the standard documentary, history records such as tax records and deeds, and written histories, even diaries and letters. Related, but slightly different, is the fact that oral history also allows us to greatly increase the range of perspectives that can be brought into the conversation on the past.”

The oral history interviews have been incorporated into the one-hour public television documentary, “Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives” (KET). This one-hour documentary features comments from residents about growing up in Davis Bottom, the tight-knit nature of the neighborhood and the vital role of the community’s park. The original, unedited interviews were also compiled into the DVD “Davis Bottom: Living Memories” (3:39 hrs.), that has been provided to participants, local institutions and area archives. The oral history interviews are restricted for research and educational use only. Here are sample clips from each interview.

For more information visit: anthropology.as.uky.edu/anthropology-oral-history-0

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