ees

Skype with Astronaut Andrew Feustel

Dr. Ravat's AST/EES 310 class had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Andrew Feustel, NASA Astronaut and Mission Specialist for STS-125 and STS-134, on April 2nd, 2013. During this fascinating hour-long conversation, Dr. Feustel described what it is like to go into space, the importance of the scientific advances enabled by NASA, and recounted his experiences on the International Space Station and on the last human service mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.

UK Honors Outstanding Advisers

The University of Kentucky's David P. Moecher and George L. Scott Jr. were honored as the recipients of the 19th annual Ken Freedman Outstanding Advisor Awards. The award recognizes outstanding service in the field of academic advising.

2013 Ken Freedman Outstanding Advisor Award: Dave Moecher

Dave Moecher, Professor and Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences Chair, is a 2013 recipient of the University of Kentucky's Ken Freedman Outstanding Advising Award which is given each year to one professional and one faculty adviser. The candidates are nominated by students and the award, named in honor of Ken Freedman, who served as a professional adviser at UK for 15 years, recognizes outstanding service in the field of academic advising. 

Professor Moecher, as the director of undergraduate studies, has advised all the majors going through his department for more than six years. As a faculty advisor, he has to balance those responsibilities with his research and teaching efforts. Different faculty have different proportions of these roles but Moecher, like other advisors, finds a special reward in the effort of serving students in this particular way and plans to continue his efforts long into the future. 
 
In this podcast, Moecher discusses the team effort required between professional and faculty advisors to make sure A&S students have the support they need.
 

This podcast was produced by Patrick O'Dowd.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Earth and Environmental Sciences Alumni Reunite for Field Camp in the Mountains

Since 1948, the University of Kentucky has operated a geology field camp in the Rocky Mountains. The field camp presents students in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) with a unique opportunity to apply principles and ideas learned from the classroom in a real-world setting.

Sesquicentennial Series: All Aboard! Next Stop, Natural Bridge

In celebration of the University of Kentucky's upcoming sesquicentennial in 2015, the 41st of 150 weekly installments remembers a popular leisure and educational travel option for the institution's students and faculty.

'Hijabs, Hydrology and Lyle Lovett,' Published in Chronicle of Higher Education

UK Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Alan Fryar was recently featured in The Chronicle of Higher Education; his essay describes his experience with 11 students from the arid Middle East and North Africa who convened in drought-stricken San Angelo, Texas, to learn about water.

New Hazard Station Added to Kentucky Seismic and Strong-motion Network

A new earthquake-monitoring station has been added to the seismic network that is jointly operated by the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS) at the University of Kentucky and the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences in the UK College of Arts and Sciences. The station is located behind the Perry County Public Library in Hazard, Ky., in the southeastern part of the state.

They Know H20: Hydrogeologists Jim Currens and Mike Farwell

Jim Currens and Mike Farwell go to work at the Kentucky Horse Park on a regular basis, but they’re not horse trainers. They’re hydrogeologists that work with the Kentucky Geological Survey to monitor groundwater in the Cane Run Watershed, which includes surface streams and underground water systems that run from north Lexington to the North Elkhorn Creek in Georgetown, Kentucky. They collect data at the Kentucky Horse Park - or, perhaps more accurately, from below the Kentucky Horse Park.

During Spring of 2012, we joined Farwell and Currens to see their research station at the Kentucky Horse Park, and got a sense of what a typical visit to the KGS hydrogeology research station is like. Also, check out the photo essay of the trip.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

 

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Geologic Mapping at the University of Kentucky

On December 1, 2011, the Kentucky Geological Survey at the University of Kentucky celebrated a major achievement in the mapping of Kentucky's geology. KGS has published all 25 maps in the 30 by 60 minute geologic map series (1:100,000 scale), making them available for free to the public on their website and through a new app.

This achievement is unparalleled by any other state, making Kentucky a leader in geologic mapping and map technology.

These detailed maps show surface and subsurface rock types, formations, and structures such as faults. Geologic formations and faults control the occurrence of minerals and fuels, groundwater, and geologic hazards.

"They are an important contribution to society because the information they provide assists in the production of resources, protection of groundwater and the environment, stability of foundations and infrastructure, and avoidance of hazards," says KGS Director and State Geologist Jim Cobb. "Because the maps are available on the Web, they are always accessible to the public at no cost. Hardcopy versions of the maps can be ordered from the Survey's Publication Sales Office."

At a news conference on campus, a super-sized geologic map of Kentucky, 10 feet high by 23 feet wide, was unveiled in the foyer of the Mining and Mineral Resources Building on campus. A symposium on geologic mapping, "Celebrating Geologic Mapping for Science and Society," was held later that day at the Boone Center and featured experts from the University of Kentucky, KGS and other state surveys, the United States Geological Survey, and academic institutions.

KGS also announced a new mapping application available to the public. Smartphone and tablet users can explore the geology of Kentucky in their vicinity by using this new Web-based app for mobile devices. This requires available GPS to pinpoint their location and data access to download the map layers. If users direct their device browsers to the KGS GeoMobile site at kgs.uky.edu/kgsmap/mobile/kgsgeoserver, they can see the geologic formations and a number of other features found at the KGS geologic mapping site.

All of these maps and mapping resources are a product of the Kentucky Geological Survey and the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey which provides annual funding for such mapping. Also significant was another geologic mapping partnership between the Kentucky Geological Survey and the USGS from 1960 to 1980 that produced the original geologic maps that laid the framework for this series. The new map series is a testament to the work that can be accomplished through federal-state-university partnerships.

On a GPS-enabled device, browse to the KGS GeoMobile site at kgs.uky.edu/kgsmap/mobile/kgsgeoserver. You can choose to view geologic formations like water wells and springs, sinkholes, coal beds, and oil and gas wells. A map of Kentucky showing the 30 x 60 minute geologic maps can be found on the KGS website at uky.edu/KGS/mapping/100k.htm.

A full-size version of each map can be found through the KGS publication search page at kgs.uky.edu/kgsweb/PubsSearching/PubsSimpleSearch.asp.

Produced by Alicia P. Gregory (Research Communications), videography/direction by Chad Rumford (Research Communications)

This video appears courtesy of Reveal: University of Kentucky Research Media research.uky.edu/reveal/index.shtml

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