latin american studies

Cinema, Slavery, and Brazilian Nationalism

By studying Brazilian films released between 1976 and 2005, Gordon examines how the films both define the national community and influence viewer understandings of "Brazilianness." Though the films he examines span decades, they all communicate their revised version of Brazilian national identity through a cinematic strategy with a dual aim: to upset ingrained ways of thinking about Brazil and to persuade those who watch the films to accept a new way of understanding their national community. 

Date: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery

Third Wave Coffee, Maya Farmers, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing

His talk focuses on specialty coffee markets and Maya farmers in Guatemala. The best coffees these days are selling for astronomical prices and even though farmers are not getting rich, they are benefitting from the market boom and have high hopes for coffee. 

Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 3:00pm
Location: 
Patterson Office Tower 18th floor West End Room
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Graduate Travel Grants

University of Kentucky Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies Program Travel Grants for Research in Latin America and the Caribbean

The Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies Program invites UK Graduate Students to apply for grants in support of summer research. Graduate students with a focus or interest in Latin America will be considered for the award. The awards are $500 for domestic travel and $700 for international travel. Funds can be used towards travel, lodging, meals and other research-related expenses.

A guide to Día de los muertos celebrations in Lexington

It’s a good weekend to be a hispanista in Lexington. Granted we’ve had a great fall; from the Lexington Latino Festival to the many activities surrounding the Arts and Sciences Passport ¡Viva México! program, those of us who love the Spanish language and Hispanic culture have been busy. Still, this Friday and Saturday are special. 

This weekend we celebrate Día de los muertos, or Day of the Dead, a well-known holiday that has become increasingly popular in the US. On November 1st and 2nd, families throughout Latin America (but especially in Mexico) build altars and visit cemeteries to remember loved ones who have passed away. The holiday is joyous, despite the macabre theme. Día de los muertos is a time to laugh with death, to accept the fact that we’re all headed that way eventually, and to give those we have lost a place at our table for the night. Here are some suggestions for how you can celebrate this weekend, just follow the hyperlinks to more information about and directions to the events. ¡Qué vivan los muertos!

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