hispanic studies

Cinema, Slavery, and Brazilian Nationalism

By studying Brazilian films released between 1976 and 2005, Gordon examines how the films both define the national community and influence viewer understandings of "Brazilianness." Though the films he examines span decades, they all communicate their revised version of Brazilian national identity through a cinematic strategy with a dual aim: to upset ingrained ways of thinking about Brazil and to persuade those who watch the films to accept a new way of understanding their national community. 

Date: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Niles Gallery

The 2015-2016 Outstanding Teaching Award Recipients Announced

There will be an Awards Ceremony to honor the recipients of these and other College awards on Wednesday, April 22 at 4 pm in the WT Young Auditorium. A reception will follow the ceremony.

How to Orchestrate a War

The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences 2014-2015 Distinguished Professor Lecture Series presentation is slated at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 25, in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.

Cuba-U.S. Relations: A Panel Discussion

Panelists: 

Peter Berres, Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, who leads an EA program in Cuba
Enrico Mario Santí, the William T. Bryan Professor of Hispanic Studies in A&S
Luciano E. Cruz, Assistant Professor of Foreign Language at the University of Cincinnati
Kathleen Montgomery, Associate Professor in the Patterson School of Diplomacy
 
Moderator: 
Susan Carvalho, Associate Provost for Internationalization, Interim Associate Provost and
Dean of the Graduate School

 

Date: 
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 - 4:00pm to 6:00pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium in Young Library

Growing & Strengthening: Two New Faculty Members in Hispanic Studies

Mónica Díaz and Matt Losada join the ranks of respected instructors and researchers in the Department of Hispanic Studies with a wealth of publications and teaching experience, as well as interest in Interdisciplinarity.

A&S Distinguished Professor Lecture

This Spanish–Moroccan war, known in Spain as the War of Africa, was a colonial military operation that resulted in the surrender of the city of Tetouan. A political victory with no tangible gains, the African War formed part of a persuasive rhetoric and a stirring propaganda used by the Spanish government to heighten the national pride of the people. The patriotic delirium surrounding this war marks the beginnings —and also the death throes— of Spanish colonialism on Moroccan territory in modern times. Spain’s military intervention in Morocco inspired an abundant literature whose aim was to glorify the war. Professor Rueda examines one-act plays on the topic of the War of Africa to reveal how war was staged and orchestrated politically through theatrical and musical performance. Burlesque musical re-presentations of the War of Africa reinforce collective yet conflictive notions of national identity, still unresolved at the threshold of Modernity, while exposing Spain’s impracticable political aspirations to regain its lost colonial power and the nation’s hesitancy to refashion itself as a modern nation.

Date: 
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 - 6:30pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
UKAA Auditorium @ WY Young Library

Chellgren Center Honors 43 New Fellows

A Trek Through the Italian Renaissance: Bailey Ubellacker

Studying abroad is considered an unforgettable experience for many of the University of Kentucky’s students. A typical study abroad program transports a group of students to a foreign country. These opportunities offer new perspectives, connections, and fond memories. The Zolondek Scholarship sets itself apart by offering students the opportunity to travel abroad on their own. 

During the summer of 2013, Bailey Ubellacker, a double major of Spanish and Elementary Education, spent three weeks abroad studying and experiencing the Italian Renaissance. Bailey Ubellacker was the recipient of the Zolondek Scholarship, which allowed her to challenge herself as she traveled alone and shaped her own study abroad experience. In this podcast, Bailey Ubellacker discusses her time in Italy and what she has brought back with her. 

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

A guide to Día de los muertos celebrations in Lexington

It’s a good weekend to be a hispanista in Lexington. Granted we’ve had a great fall; from the Lexington Latino Festival to the many activities surrounding the Arts and Sciences Passport ¡Viva México! program, those of us who love the Spanish language and Hispanic culture have been busy. Still, this Friday and Saturday are special. 

This weekend we celebrate Día de los muertos, or Day of the Dead, a well-known holiday that has become increasingly popular in the US. On November 1st and 2nd, families throughout Latin America (but especially in Mexico) build altars and visit cemeteries to remember loved ones who have passed away. The holiday is joyous, despite the macabre theme. Día de los muertos is a time to laugh with death, to accept the fact that we’re all headed that way eventually, and to give those we have lost a place at our table for the night. Here are some suggestions for how you can celebrate this weekend, just follow the hyperlinks to more information about and directions to the events. ¡Qué vivan los muertos!

Preparations

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - hispanic studies
X
Enter your linkblue username.
Enter your linkblue password.
Secure Login

This login is SSL protected

Loading