Media

Four UK Biologists Form Regeneration "Cluster"

How are some animals able to regrow body parts following injury? Why can't humans do the same thing? Four professors in the University of Kentucky in the Department of Biology—Ann Morris, Randal Voss, Jeramiah Smith, and Ashley Seifert—are undertaking the basic scientific research needed to begin to answer these questions. Each scientist approaches the problem from a different angle, focusing on different aspects of regeneration, and using different vertebrate models. Together, they make up the core of an unofficial regeneration "cluster" within the department.

Produced by Research Communications at the University of Kentucky.

Your textbook is still wrong about the Milky Way galaxy

 

 

Dr. Heidi Newberg Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Fifteen years ago, we modeled the distribution of stars in the Milky Way using three components: an exponential disk, a power law spheroid, and a bulge. Then, we discovered the distribution of stars in the spheroid was lumpy due to the accretion and tidal disruption of dwarf galaxies that ventured too close the the Galactic center. We now wonder whether the Milky Way has a classical bulge at all; likely the bulge-like feature we see is instead due to the Galactic bar. And most recently, we are discovering large scale departures from the standard exponential disk. New discoveries point to variations in the expected bulk velocities of stars in the Galactic disk, and oscillations in the spatial densities of disk stars. Some believe these observations point to a wave response to the passing of dwarf galaxies (or dark matter lumps) through the Milky Way's disk. These waves may also explain the observed rings of stars, 15-25 kpc from the Galactic center, which is farther out than we originally believed the disk to extend.

 

 

Explaining the Global Warming Theory

 

 

Dr. Joseph P. Straley University of Kentucky Explaining the implications of science to contemporary public issues is an important part of our job. As an example I will give an introduction to the global warming issue.

 

 

John L. Esposito - The Future of Islam

One of the most respected American scholarly authority on Islam, John L. Esposito, visited the University of Kentucky Wednesday, September 10, 2014, to discuss “The Future of Islam: Assessing the Elements of Reform, Revival, and Fundamentalism in the Muslim World,” at the Singletary Center Recital Hall.

The event was part of the University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences Passport to the World 2014-15 program Year of the Middle East: Crossroads of the World.

A professor of Islamic Studies and International Affairs at Georgetown University, Esposito discussed his book on the portrait of Islam today and tomorrow, drawn by a lifetime of thought and research to sweep away the negative stereotypes of the fastest growing religion in the world. Esposito’s interviews and articles with newspapers, magazines, and the media in Europe, Asia, and the Middle East: The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Economist, The Guardian, The Times of London, CNN, ABC Nightline, CBS, NBC and the BBC.

George Herring

Leni for Review

Dr. George Scherr - Hall of Fame 2014

Pick it Up No Titles (Final Review)

Lee Baxter Hall of Fame - for review

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