Media

The Astrophysics of Black Hole Spin

 

 

Dr. Reynolds University of Maryland In addition to providing vital clues as to the formation and evolution of black holes, the spin of black holes may be an important energy source in the Universe. Over the past couple of years, tremendous progress has been made in the realm of observational measurements of spin. I will describe these efforts with particular focus on the use of X-ray spectroscopy to probe the spin of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN). For the first time, we are obtaining hints about the distribution of spins across the population of supermassive black holes with some interesting and unexpected consequences. After discussing spin, I will also address questions related to the driving of relativistic jets from AGN and the jet-disk connection. I shall conclude by discussing future prospects enabled by Astro-H (to be launched in 2015) and LOFT/ATHENA+ (currently under consideration by ESA).

 

 

Group photo Omani Students

 

 

Omani National Day Celebration University of Kentucky 2013 via: youtube.com/watch?v=hbQMigsm6PE

 

 

Yola Dance Walk to Stage Omani National Day Celebration University of Kentucky 2013

 

 

Omani National Day Celebration University of Kentucky 2013

 

 

Omani Students Dance and pose after the program

 

 

Omani National Day Celebration University of Kentucky 2013 youtube.com/watch?v=hbQMigsm6PE

 

 

The Committee on Social Theory Presents: Dr. Simon Critchley

The Hamlet Doctrine November 14, 2013

The Radon EDM Experiment

 

 

Dr. Tim Chupp University of Michigan A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or system would arise due to breaking of time-reversal (T), or equivalently charge-conjugation/parity (CP) symmetry. Over the past five decades, a number of experiments on the neutron, atoms and molecules have only set upper limits on EDMs, and the search continues, motivated in large part by the expectation that beyond Standard-Model physics CP violation is required to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In addition, new techniques and access to systems in which the effects of CP violation would be greatly enhanced are driving the field forward. Systems that may be favorable for significant advances include the isotopes 225Ra and 221/223Rn, where the combination of significant octupole collectivity and relatively closely spaced opposite parity levels would increase the nuclear Schiff moment by orders of magnitude compared to other diamagnetic atoms, i.e. 199Hg. A number of technical and nuclear-structure issues must be addressed in order to assess the prospects for an experiment of significant impact. Among the technical challenges for the Radon-EDM program are developing an on-line EDM experiment at an isotope-production facility that will collect and make measurements on the short-lived species (half lives are approximately 25 min). We have developed and tested a system for high-efficiency collection and spin-exchange polarization of noble-gas isotopes that has been tested at the TRIUMF ISAC facility (experiment S929). Radon polarization techniques were studied at ISOLDE and Stony Brook, and spin-precession detection techniques are under development. Nuclear-structure issues include determining the octupole collectivity as well as the spacing of opposite parity levels. A series of experiments at ISOLDE (IS475 and IS552) have recently directly measured octupole collectivity in 220Rn and 224Ra leading to strengthened confidence in conclusions about the octupole enhancements. Experiments are also underway at NSCL at Michigan State University TRIUMF/ISAC to study the nuclear structure of isotopes in this mass region. I will report on progress on all these fronts and discuss recent developments in our studies of how we learn about the basic physical parameters of CP violation from the suite of EDM measurements.

 

 

Festival Latino de Lexington

 

 

Festival Latino de Lexington is an annual event that bring crowds in excess of 30,000 people to the Courthouse Plaza in downtown Lexington to celebrate Latino culture and heritage. The two day event is packed with a parade, music, dancing, authentic cuisine, art vendors, youth activities, and a fireworks display. It is also an event that the University of Kentucky actively engages in, and this past year was no different, as a group of visiting Ecuadorian scholars with the Center for English as a Second Language (CESL) performed a traditional dance routine. CESL hosts visiting scholars from around the world, and cultural events like Festival Latino de Lexington allow our visitors to not only experience such events, but actively participate in sharing their culture with the people of Kentucky.

To learn more about the Center for English as a Second Language visit esl.as.uky.edu

 

 

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