Media

STEMCats: Assisting with Science

While STEMCats may be one of the newest Living Learning Communities on campus, it is providing incoming students with many unique opportunities. Students are not only able to live on campus and take courses with like-minded peers, but STEMCats also allows incoming freshmen students to participate in research and connect with peers, upperclassmen, and professors. In this podcast, we talk with several Undergraduate Instructional Assistants, or UIA’s, who have been building connections with STEMCats freshmen through sharing their experiences. Learn more about the STEMCats program and UIA’s as they speak about what they enjoy about the program and their connections with younger students.

This podcast was produced by Casey Hibbard

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STEMCats: Assisting with Science by UK College of Arts & Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Stephen Voss Discusses Kentucky Senate Election Results

 

 

Voss, an associate professor in the Department of Political Science in the University of Kentucky Colleges of Arts and Sciences, discusses how Mitch McConnell defeated challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes in the Kentucky Senate race.

 

 

Stephen Voss Discusses the 2014 Kentucky Senatorial Race

 

 

Voss, an associate professor and chair of the Department of Political Science in the University of Kentucky Colleges of Arts and Sciences, discusses Kentucky Senatorial candidates Mitch McConnell and Alison Lundergan Grimes and the national prominence of this election.

 

 

Microfiction - The Future of Microfiction

"Long Time Ago..." A Performance by Crit Callebs, Eastern Band Cherokee Storyteller

 

 

Crit Callebs (Eastern Band Cherokee descendant) is a traditional hunter, food gatherer, and fire-tender and lives on the Yakama Nation Indian Reservation. He is completing his Master’s Degree at Central Washington University (CWU) in Cultural Resource Management with an expertise in treaty rights concerning Indian hunting and fishing. He served as the Native American Liaison at the Center for Diversity and Social Justice and was a very popular guest lecturer for the American Indian Studies program. Crit is a trainer for the “Since Time Immemorial” tribal sovereignty and history curriculum implemented in K-12 classrooms in Washington State. As an active member of the Northwest Indian Storytelling Association he has been a featured storyteller for the Tseil-Waututh Nation, CWU Museum of Culture and Environment, Colville Tribes Youth “Warrior Camp” and is the 2014 Alaska Spirit of Reading storyteller. Crit is also a professional survival trainer and former instructor for the world renowned Boulder Outdoors Survival School. One of his great passions is teaching youth and adults how to be self-reliant in the wilderness. Using his gift of storytelling, he travels throughout the U.S. and Canada sharing traditional stories, teaching cultural camps and conducting workshops that promote self-awareness, ancestral skills, and Indigenous values.

 

 

Arts & Sciences Hall of Fame 2014

The College of Arts and Sciences inducted six new members into its Hall of Fame Oct. 10, 2014, with a ceremony at the Singletary Center for the Arts, bringing the current totals to 38 alumni and 13 emeritus faculty A&S Hall of Fame members.

2014 Alumni Inductees:

Ethelee Davidson Baxter

Robert Straus Lipman

Jill M. Rappis

George H. Scherr

2014 Emeriti Faculty Inductees:

George C. Herring

Keith B. MacAdam

View their Hall of Fame videos here: as.uky.edu/celebrates-new-hall-fame-members

Stanley Brunn: Life as a Geographer

 

 

a Q&A session with Emeritus Professor Stanley Brunn

October 17th, 2014 Presented by: The University of Kentucky College of Arts and Sciences

 

 

Rapid Arctic warming and extreme weather events in mid-latitudes: Are they connected?

 

 

Dr. Jennifer Francis Rutgers University In this presentation, I will discuss the hypothesis proposed by Francis and Vavrus (2012) that links rapid Arctic warming (so-called Arctic amplification) to changes in the large-scale atmospheric circulation in the northern hemisphere that favors more persistent weather patterns and a higher likelihood of extreme weather events such as droughts, cold spells, flooding, heavy snows, and heat waves. This hypothesis has been a topic of considerable controversy in recent months, particularly regarding its relationship to the unusual weather conditions that persisted in the winter of 2013/2014. I will discuss various aspects of this linkage, what we know and don't know, and present new related research.

 

 

Science Policy in America

 

 

Dr. Tyler Glembo The American Physical Society Science Policy in America Fundamental scientific research, as a majority federally funded initiative, is becoming more deeply embedded in politics. Since the end of the Space Race, funding of basic physical sciences research as a percent GDP has continuously declined, indicating that policy makers see funding scientific research as less of a priority than they once did. Indeed, a lack of understanding about both science and how science is done amongst members of Congress has led to both reduced prioritization and also to misguided attempts at regulation, such as making peer review a public process and considering Congressional oversight for specific grants. Here we will examine a few current issues in science policy and the need for physicists to effectively weigh in on such policy issues. We will also consider the positive or negative effects such public engagement may have on our scientific careers and ways in which you can get involved.

 

 

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